Puppies and Dogs

At 6 weeks old your puppy will be ready for their first veterinary examination. Here we’ll cover all the basics of puppy care, nutrition, microchipping and preventative health care.
Vaccination – all puppies should be vaccinated against Parvovirus, Distemper, Hepatits and Canine Cough. Your puppy should be vaccinated at 6 weeks, 9-10 weeks and 12-14 weeks of age. 
All puppies should be wormed every 2 weeks until 12 weeks of age, then monthly until 6 months of age.
Flea and tick treatments should be started at 8 weeks (ensure the product is safe for young puppies).

Heartworm is transmitted by mosquitoes and has a high prevalence in QLD. Proheart is a long acting injection that can be timed with annual vaccinations and is recommend for heartworm prevention in dogs. Alternatively, monthly chews or spot-on treatments are available to control heartworm.
Adult dogs should receive annual vaccination boosters for ongoing protection. Up to date vaccinations are also required if your dog is to go to a boarding kennel.

Annual check ups provide an ideal opportunity for your veterinarian to perform a complete physical examination and wellness check of your dog and to discuss any concerns you may have.

Kittens and Cats

Vaccination is an important and necessary part of your cat’s preventative health program. Yearly vaccination ensures protection against several serious and potentially fatal diseases.
With the reemergence of Feline Panleukopenia Virus – also known as Feline Enteritis or Feline Parvovirus – in Australia, vaccinating your cat on time is even more important. Unvaccinated cats or incompletely vaccinated kittens are at risk.
Kittens should receive 3 primary vaccinations every 3-4 weeks from 6-8 weeks old, and then annually.
Up to date vaccinations are also required if your cat is to go to a boarding cattery.
Annual vaccinations provide an ideal opportunity for your veterinarian to perform a complete physical examination and wellness check of your cat and to discuss any concerns you may have.
Indoor cats still need to be vaccinated, as many of the diseases we vaccinate against are airborne (such as cat flu) or can be brought into the home on your shoes. Your cat therefore does not need to come into direct contact with another cat to become infected. The fact that your cat is housed inside means it is isolated and removes any opportunity to be naturally immunised. As a result their level of immunity may in fact be lower than cats that are allowed outside.

Vaccine Status Evaluation

Vaccine antibody titre testing is also available for dogs and cats. This requires a small amount of blood and can be used to determine whether or not a dog requires a booster vaccination.